Celebrating women in engineering with 4 of our inspring team members

by STRYDE
Jun 21, 2022 4:02:57 PM

At STRYDE, we are proud to have a fantastic team who are dedicated to making the impossible possible through pioneering seismic technology and data processing solutions that are changing the landscape of the engineering sector.

 

To celebrate International Women in Engineering Day 2022, we’ve cast the spotlight on four of our phenomenal women working here at STRYDE, asking them to share their career story, the challenges they’ve overcome and the advice they would give to other women hoping to start their career in engineering…

 

 

Camille Lapierre Chief Technical Officer (2)

1. What is your career story so far? How did you get to the position you are in today?

“My career began at the same time I was studying for my PhD. I had always been interested in the science and engineering of permafrost - not a very common interest for ladies, so I was usually the only one in a community of men! Building my reputation was the first thing I did to excel in my career. I was extremely focused on becoming one of the best field workers and engineers in the seismic crews I worked on. My hard work and commitment to this, presented many opportunities and led to me joining STRYDE earlier this year. 

  • Dinara Alblyazina, Technical and Geophysical Lead at STRYDE 

 

“I graduated as a general engineer in France before embarking on the seismic vessels of CGG where I got totally hooked on the industry! My first roles were mostly technical, then they evolved to more managerial positions as my experience and passion grew. STRYDE contacted me about a year ago when they were on their hunt for a CTO. When I met the team, I quickly became very passionate about the innovative technology, opportunities for growth and the dynamics of the team.”

  • Camille Lapierre, CTO at STRYDE 

 

“I started out with a strong academic background in Maths and Physics, and completed my PhD research in Geophysics which set me up for a career in engineering and the energy sector. After I graduated, I worked in different geophysical roles at BP and Schlumberger for many years before joining the team as a Senior Geophysicist at STRYDE.”

  • Zhongmin Song, Senior Research Geophysicist at STRYDE 

“I come from Silesia - an industrial region in the south of Poland which is famous for its coal mines. In high school, I was fascinated by volcanoes so I decided to study Geology where I could pursue that interest and find a job. At the University of Science and Technology in Krakow, I discovered a whole new world of Geophysics which still fascinates me to this day. You can never stop learning and exploring in the field of Geophysics, especially now when the world is changing so much around us with the Energy Transition already underway!”

  • Celina Giersz, Senior Processing Geophysicist 

 

2. Did you face any struggles as a woman in engineering, and if so, how did you overcome them?


“To start on a positive note, I have never felt any deference or hostility from my colleagues, even though I have worked offshore as the only woman aboard for several weeks at a time. The good thing about engineers is that they are generally very rational and tend to judge you for your work and competencies regardless of your gender or origin.”

“After 10-12 years in the industry, I was falling behind in career progression both in terms of role and salary, but I have been very lucky to meet a few key managers (of both genders) who brought opportunities to me. The most difficult step for me has been to evolve from a mid-level project or team manager level to a senior manager leading a full department - I wouldn’t have achieved this without the support of my managers at the time.”

  • Camille Lapierre, CTO at STRYDE 

 

“Juggling work and family has been my biggest challenge as a woman working in the industry - it had been my main challenge when my 3 girls were young, they are now grown up and I believe I set a positive example for the girls - they have all worked hard, got into Oxbridge and are excelling towards their goals."

"It can be really tough trying to fulfill both roles and give each area of my life all the energy and commitment I really want to give. The way I’m continuing to overcome this is to always try to be positive, deliver the best work I can, and keep smiling through it, you can only do your best.”

  • Zhongmin Song, Senior Research Geophysicist at STRYDE 

 

“As a woman working in the very conservative industry of onshore field seismic crews, I found that the stereotypes of women being weak and nervous, or requiring more attention in their role was a challenge to overcome. I’ve decided just to keep doing the best that I can in my role, be polite, be kind and always try to listen to others without judgement.”

  • Dinara Alblyazina, Technical and Geophysical Lead at STRYDE 

 

“I applied for summer internships in my hometown’s coal mine to better understand the mining processes, as well as the monitoring of seismicity induced by the exploitation of coal. In a predominantly male-oriented workplace, this had its challenges - from uniform and safety equipment not available in a small size, to being subjected to pranks when 1km deep in the mine. I didn’t let any of that put me off, and I completed the internship with a lot of good memories and friendships. I think the miners realised that I am serious in my learning, but I also like to have a good laugh too!”

  • Celina Giersz, Senior Processing Geophysicist 

 

3. What advice would you offer to other women who want to get into and thrive in the world of engineering


“Don’t be put off by the low representation of women in technical roles: engineers are usually very rational and mostly - if not solely - motivated by science and job content, which actually helps to nurture a more straightforward working environment with fewer egos. 

“That being said, even though there are currently much fewer women than men in engineering, we must always strive not to be simply tolerated - it’s important that we stay vigilant and speak up if we are not given the same consideration and opportunities as any male engineer of the team.”

  • Camille Lapierre, CTO at STRYDE 

 

“My biggest piece of advice would be to always be open to continuous learning and development. This is an industry that is undergoing huge changes and will continue to do so in the future, so it’s crucial that you are keeping up with the times and developing your knowledge and expertise so you have that competitive edge.”

  • Zhongmin Song, Senior Research Geophysicist at STRYDE 

 

“I would say to always just do the best you can and strive to move forward no matter what talk you hear about gender stereotypes - rise above it. The world can be a beautiful place and open to all engineers who are willing to work hard.”

  • Dinara Alblyazina, Technical and Geophysical Lead at STRYDE 

 

“I believe that talent does not recognise gender, so if you are female and interested in science subjects, don’t be afraid to choose an engineering field and develop your skills in it. Speak up if you experience discrimination, inequality, or inappropriate treatment because there will most likely be other people in a similar situation. Build your connection network early on - having some strong role models and good mentors around helps when in doubt, so choose them carefully.”

  • Celina Giersz, Senior Processing Geophysicist 

 

 

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